Pachinko

Pachinko

eBook - 2017
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"A new tour de force from the bestselling author of Free Food for Millionaires, for readers of The Kite Runner and Cutting for Stone. PACHINKO follows one Korean family through the generations, beginning in early 1900s Korea with Sunja, the prized daughter of a poor yet proud family, whose unplanned pregnancy threatens to shame them all. Deserted by her lover, Sunja is saved when a young tubercular minister offers to marry and bring her to Japan. So begins a sweeping saga of an exceptional family in exile from its homeland and caught in the indifferent arc of history. Through desperate struggles and hard-won triumphs, its members are bound together by deep roots as they face enduring questions of faith, family, and identity"--
Publisher: New York :, Grand Central Publishing,, 2017
ISBN: 9781455569656
Branch Call Number: Online eBook
Characteristics: 1 online resource
text file, rda
Additional Contributors: OverDrive, Inc

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m
mcdoff
Apr 13, 2019

Arlene or Joanne rec'd

m
ms_mustard
Apr 10, 2019

loved this book and everyone in my book club was very glad to have read it
great generational story, great insights
so much can be related to colonized peoples all over the world
as the author says - how to live when the people where you live wish you were dead

r
rogebc_0
Apr 06, 2019

A wonderful saga of four generations of Korean and Japanese people and history. Well written, with a feeling of acceptance of each life as it unfolds that echoes some eastern philosophies. Great characters and historic events from a new point of view - the point of view of Koreans who suffered under Japanese colonization pre and during WWII and then the Korean War which has never ended. Pachinko is a game played on a machine that is something like a pin ball machine standing up vertically. It is played with passion in Japan per the author and internet investigation. There is a limited betting component and Pachinko shops were one of few businesses open to Koreans living in Japan during the early and mid 1900s.

c
cgriles
Mar 30, 2019

Read

Chapel_Hill_MarthaW Feb 28, 2019

This almost reminded me of a Victorian novel, in the sense of its ambitious scope (the better part of the 20th century) and its focus on a wide cast of characters (four generations of the same family). The characters are the real joy of this book -- they are developed so thoughtfully and with such nuance that they feel like real people you know, though the leaps forward in time (often by several years) to different points in their lives can occasionally feel frustrating, since you feel like you're missing out on moments with people you've come to care for. The central theme of this novel is that life, like the titular game, is full of wins and losses -- more of the latter than the former, but you continue on hoping to be one of the lucky ones. This makes for a read that is occasionally depressing -- the fate of one character in particular was a bit of a gut punch -- but completely engrossing.

z
Zedd
Feb 08, 2019

This was a wonderful story, told over generations. I highly recommend it.

p
Pressroom
Feb 02, 2019

Fascinating story of Koreans trying to live and succeed in Japan, where they are never fully accepted and face rampant discrimination. The theme of assimilating in a land where all anyone see is your 'otherness,' permeates this novel. And different characters try different approaches to cope in their new land, with some trying to be the perfect immigrant, others throwing themselves into fulfilling the worst stereotypes assigned to them. It's a very timely book for any person of color living in America these days.

b
becker
Jan 28, 2019

A perfect read for anyone who likes historical fiction, multi-generational family sagas or cultural stories with exotic settings.

a
annabug4
Dec 30, 2018

May

s
scrowell_09
Dec 25, 2018

Ultimately disappointing. The book has no real ending, it's as if the author decided she no longer had interest in the story. There are too many coincidences, the characters are two-dimensional and by the story's end, there are too many characters, the story becomes disjointed and I'm at a loss to understand why the author wrote this book - what message was she trying to convey other than Koreans were treated badly by the Japanese but it all worked out in the end ??

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Tjad2L
Aug 23, 2017

Sexual Content: explicit sexual content

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