The Rainbow Comes and Goes

The Rainbow Comes and Goes

A Mother and Son on Life, Love, and Loss

Audiobook CD - 2016
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A touching and intimate correspondence between Anderson Cooper and his mother, Gloria Vanderbilt, offering timeless wisdom and a revealing glimpse into their lives

Though Anderson Cooper has always considered himself close to his mother, his intensely busy career as a journalist for CNN and CBS affords him little time to spend with her. After she suffers a brief but serious illness at the age of ninety-one, they resolve to change their relationship by beginning a year-long conversation unlike any they had ever had before. The result is a correspondence of surprising honesty and depth in which they discuss their lives, the things that matter to them, and what they still want to learn about each other.

Both a son s love letter to his mother and an unconventional mom s life lessons for her grown son, The Rainbow Comes and Goes offers a rare window into their close relationship and fascinating life stories, including their tragedies and triumphs. In these often humorous and moving exchanges, they share their most private thoughts and the hard-earned truths they ve learned along the way. In their words their distinctive personalities shine through Anderson s journalistic outlook on the world is a sharp contrast to his mother s idealism and unwavering optimism.

An appealing memoir with inspirational advice, The Rainbow Comes and Goes is a beautiful and affectionate celebration of the universal bond between a parent and a child, and a thoughtful reflection on life, reminding us of the precious insight that remains to be shared, no matter our age."

Publisher: [New York] :, Harper Audio,, [2016]
Copyright Date: ℗2016
ISBN: 9780062466563
0062466569
Characteristics: 5 audio discs (6 hr.) :,digital ;,12 cm., in container
digital, optical, stereo, rda
audio file, CD audio, rda
Additional Contributors: Vanderbilt, Gloria 1924-

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r
rpavlacic
Nov 19, 2018

Written as a series of e-mails between mother and son but resulting in a double autobiography, this is a heartfelt conversation of the kind most parents and kids should have. Hard to put down.

s
SusieQB1
Oct 29, 2018

I was looking forward to this read but it wasn't too long into it that I was not buying into it. It just seemed like an interview that Anderson would do as opposed to a mom and son conversation. And, Gloria came across as more interested in herself than her son who was revealing his sadness and pain. She had a horrible mother and was used by many, but we already knew that. Anderson with his denials and control issues needs to dig a little deeper into himself, never mind his mother.

ArapahoeMaryA Aug 28, 2018

I love the contrast in the exchange of thoughts between this mother and her son. I found it interesting to learn a little about Gloria Vanderbilt's life, but - in all honesty (and making allowances for her difficult childhood) - I didn't develop a fondness for her as I read.

k
katboxjanitor
Mar 06, 2018

A loving year long conversational memoir between mother & son.

Stepping through some painful memories, but also discovering how differently they each perceived a given event is one of many important messages.
More so is the different ways love is felt, heard, given, taken and lost.

A deeply personal, respectful conversation with a commitment to avoid the sensational gossipy memoir.
I value the time I spent reading this book more for the LACK of sensationalism and the sincerity and openness they shared with us.

Note:
The format was easy to follow as Anderson & his mother handed the 'pen' back & forth. There is a subtle difference in the typeface to help indicate who the 'speaker' is. It really helped me pick up the story after each interruption of my reading.

d
Daj_O
Jan 07, 2018

Interesting insight into a well-known family. Gloria is amazing and her age and life experiences have given all the benefit of perspective. Long live Gloria!

q
QnVz
Nov 27, 2017

I'm glad I came across this book. Lovely insight on the relationship of a family well known but unknown in their dynamics.

e
emiliab31
Oct 12, 2017

Comforting, insightful, and genuine. A conversation between 2 generations holding very different perspectives on life, reading this book satisfies one's longing for home and all the wonderful memories it holds.

l
Lynstars
Feb 21, 2017

Really interesting listen about mother and son Gloria Vanderbilt and Anderson Cooper discussing their similarities, differences, and lives as a whole.

p
pamspearls
Jan 11, 2017

Beautifully written and very touching. A book for every one's list.

DBRL_KrisA Nov 27, 2016

For almost a year, Anderson Cooper and his mother, Gloria Vanderbilt, had an email conversation where they discussed Vanderbilt's childhood, her marriages, and their family life together, including Cooper's struggle to come out to her as being gay. As Cooper was growing up, his mother never talked about her life, so this was his opportunity to ask her about some things they'd never discussed before. It was strange to me some of the things he never knew about - the custody battle between Vanderbilt's mother and aunt; her marriage to conductor Leopold Stokowski; her flings with Howard Hughes and Frank Sinatra (among others). The custody battle was termed the "trial of the century" when it was held in the 1930s, and Vanderbilt has been a favorite subject of paparazzi and gossip columnists for most of her adult life. It seems a bit naive of Cooper to not have some knowledge of his mother's past.
Having recently read George Hodgman's Bettyville, another mother/son memoir, it seems only right to compare the two. While Hodgman's book is narrative in style, a story of Betty's life, Cooper's and Vanderbilt's book is epistolary in nature - a back-and-forth of email messages, with an occasional explanatory note by Cooper. For a mother and son writing to each other, the language seems incredibly formal and stilted, but I imagine part of that is due to Vanderbilt's age, her reserved nature, and (possibly) the fact that these are, after all, members of the "upper crust" of society. (They're Vanderbilts, for crying out loud!) Nevertheless, the language style led me to wonder if the correspondents knew at the onset of their little email project that the result would be turned into a book; Vanderbilt especially sometimes seems as though she's making a speech at some charity event or seminar.
It was interesting to learn some new things about this family, and the Vanderbilts as a whole, and Gloria Vanderbilt seems like a genuinely nice person. And I've always liked Anderson Cooper. I did find interesting his comments on his own personal life - his financial frugality, and his comparison of his realistic view versus Vanderbilt's more optimistic one.

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ArapahoeMaryA Aug 28, 2018

The rainbow comes and goes. Enjoy it while it lasts. Don’t be surprised by its departure, and rejoice when it returns.

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